Chasing the Wind

A roaring wind blows through the tall trees. I stand on tee “one” waiting for the freeway to be free for my upcoming shot. One of the golfers ahead is still in my range, probably searching for his stray ball among the trees on the right. I wonder why on most golf courses in the world wind blows rightward? It’s not easy to play golf in the wind but a lighter one makes it fun. 

Wind sometimes blows to make our hair dance and sometimes it shakes our feet. At times it flaps a flag and at others it rustles the leaves. Not all winds blow physically: some blow inside our minds. And those are the winds that shake us the most; winds of thought not only uproot us, they turn others turtle as well.

Ahmad Faraz, a great Urdu poet, complains about the pressure of air,

“اگرچہ زور ہواؤں نے ڈال رکھا ہے

مگر چراغ نے لو کو سنبھال رکھا ہے” 

Although wind blows very hard,

The lamp is trying to keep the flame secure.

Not all lamps survive the wind, nor are all flames doused by the gust. Another wind is blowing around us today and it is the wind of change. We learn of new scientific inventions routinely. We are witnessing solar power replacing traditional sources like gasoline at godspeed. We are watching advances in space travel, and much more. 

Every aspect of human life is being reformed yet the most dangerous and hazardous of the elements remain untouched. 

Hatred, jealousy, and greed are a few factors that bring humanity to the verge of annihilation again and again. We have seen apartheid, genocides, battles, and wars engineered by these human emotions in service of the ego. Do we need to control and contain our hatred, jealousy, and greed? Did someone ever try to learn how to curb these feelings?

As we are so sensitive to the improvement of human bodies, don’t we need to restructure our thought process? Our school systems, and training courses require a considerable part of our life span. We make excellent doctors, teachers, engineers, artists, and poets. Our intellectual training is remarkable. On the other hand, our society pays so little attention to building character. We just brush it aside, saying it’s human nature. Nature can not be changed. It may be so but I am sure our modern society can come up with something. 

I wish a wind would blow that would change our minds, our way of thinking, and spread laughter and love. It may blow away hatred and jealousy from our lives, with the winds of peace and equal rights spreading throughout the globe. A wind of gratitude and harmony among our neighborhoods and streets. Sometimes we just dream and become wishful. Someday these dreams may come true. 

“When someone criticizes or disagrees with you, a small ant of hatred and antagonism is born in your heart. If you do not squash that ant at once, it might grow into a snake, or even a dragon.”

Rumi

By

Ahsan Jamil 

Golfer, Blogger, Entrepreneur, Author, Poet, Wanderer, photographer, Rebel. 

Email: Golfaij@gmail.com

Website: Golfaij.com 

YouTube: Morning with Golf

Cry of a Current

“Success is in the journey, but reward is the view from the top.”

Larry Stevens

In the wide world of a wild ocean a cunning current cherishes the openness of it all. A burning star in the bright sky invites the water of the current to evaporate and join a wider world up there. Melodious air runs in between and offers the vapor a ride on its wings. Intoxicated by the heat, fumes of water join the wind and blow away to the skies. Sky, who is the writer of destiny, parks that gasified drop of water among millions of others like it, called clouds. Clouds then travel to destinations unknown. Only the wind knows the way. Somewhere thirsty earth longs for the substance of those clouds and air blows to facilitate it. Yet the vapor thinks it was on its way to the skies. Temperature up there is lower than the ocean. Cold vapor is unable to cross over and it returns to become a drop again, this time a raindrop. 

“As you start to walk on the way, the way appears.”

Rumi

The raindrops fall back to the earth. Some reunite with sea water. Others land somewhere on the thirsty soil. Those who fall on sea rejoice and rejuvenate through their reunions. Others who fall on the land meet different fates. It’s not an easy journey ahead for them. Everything they touch desperately needs them for their own survival. These drops are a lifeline for so many. A drop of water is so valuable on the land that it is amazed by its vital role. Its significance multiplies and the value of its existence soars. 

A drop of water is a seed of life on land. 

The soil sings for the arrival of clouds and seeds in the grounds worship for the rains. All flora and fauna celebrate rains and so do the skies. Rain may be a flute of the angels and the rainbow proves that heaven exists. Flower or thorn, rain knows no discrimination, it falls on all. Not all drops enjoy becoming a current of an ocean again. Some become creeks and others run as rivers. A few float in tubs and some current in creeks. Some begin to stink in gutters and some sit in marshes. Many irrigate crops and some nourish aquatic plants. 

Not all who come to earth lead the same life. On this planet every one meets their own fate. And what is fate but one’s placement here on the globe. They call it existence, I call it destiny. They call it life, I call it time. I wonder what existence on earth is other than the state of mind. Drop or leaf, breeze or ray of sun, breath of life or fragrance of a flower, everything on this planet is just a brief journey. Lucky are those who find a peaceful path. And what is peace again? A state of mind. A dewdrop sitting on a rose petal wonders, what did I do to deserve such a great existence? And cries a current in gratitude to be back in the ocean once again. 

“And you? When will you begin that long journey into yourself?”

Rumi 

By

Ahsan Jamil 

Golfer, Blogger, Entrepreneur, Author, Poet, Wanderer, photographer, Rebel. 

Email: Golfaij@gmail.com

Website: Golfaij.com 

YouTube: Morning with Golf

The River

It was a sunny day. A warm breeze was trying to announce the arrival of summer. I was lying in a hammock among tall pines on the bank of a melodious river. Sidney Sheldon’s Windmills of the Gods was open on my phone. where it read,

 “Just remember, when someone has an accent, it means that he knows one more language than you do.”

Of course there are many accents and dialects across the globe, but plants, too, have their own language and expressions. Tall pine trees around the hammock form their own fraternity and they smile and sing to each other. One tells the other that “nature has so much in store that water in the river keeps running, sun keeps shining, nights keep returning and we are standing here for so long.” The other tree answers, “Yes, you are right. But the dwellers of these homes change sporadically. Their stay with us is temporary yet they disturb our peace so much. They cut and trim our colleagues, mow the grass, kill many of us to fulfill their own needs. They bring stinking charcoal to make roads. They paint their homes with dangerous chemicals. Constantly their vehicles emit killer gases. Their air conditioners emit hydrofluorocarbons, which are very harmful to the environment.”

“Yes,” replies the tree again, “you are right.”

“On the other hand they grow beautiful flowers, plant cute shrubs, they nourish them, the smell of their food is so great, they also provide us clean ground. They blow off fallen leaves, save us from diseases. Their contribution is rewarding as well.” 

In the meantime the river begins to add more music to their duet. What a mesmerizing sound the running water makes in the great company of pebbles. It has its own accent—and so too do the stones. I can hear birds singing to the tunes of them all. Squirrels came to dance and a couple of turkeys are hitting their beaks hard against the ground as if adding a percussive sting. I simply stick to the rhythm of my breathing, realizing that a human sound—no matter how melodious it might be—can scare them. At this stage I must remain an audience. And focus on trying to hear what they say. What message are they attempting to relay? 

I don’t want to comprehend their lyrics, nor do I want to translate anything into my language. I simply want to become one of them: to be a humble part of their choir. The running water, shining sun, cool breeze, tall trees, singing birds, dancing squirrels, knocking turkeys, grazing deers, and a peaceful human will make this planet much prettier than before. We can be there like they all are there. And that may be the ultimate song of harmony the earth longs for. 

“Like a shadow I am and I am not.”

Rumi

By

Ahsan Jamil 

Golfer, Blogger, Entrepreneur, Author, Poet, Wanderer, photographer, Rebel. 

Email: Golfaij@gmail.com

Website: Golfaij.com 

YouTube: Morning with Golf

The Fall

“When the world pushes you to your knees, you are in the perfect position to pray.”

Rumi

The rising stars, soaring birds, mountain climbers and growing trees, golfers seldom look downward. Their rise is what matters to them. The fact is! What goes up comes down. Most of world history is just a book of the rise and fall of races, religions, empires and historical figures. Kingdom formed and lost. In most stories of success and defeat, principally, reasons and causes are always the same, merely the names or dates change. What never changes is the mistakes that all successful people make. Fall is inevitable when the successful stop listening to advice. At a stage the successful begin to believe to be the wisest. As a result of lack of consultancy, they don’t place the right people for the right job. Pick and choose, liking and disliking. Personal whims & unnecessary delays become routine. The flattery that causes superiority complex, high headedness that leads to ignorance and heroism that provides fire for arrogance. Such are roots that feed the Banyan of downfall. Centuries and millennials change but the ingredients of rise and fall remain the same. 

Success also has its own rules. Identifying a goal. Determination to achieve it. Patience to train. Will to practice. Sincerity to sweat. Sacrificing for the purpose and willingness to make repeated attempts  birth success. 

In the battles of achievements mostly the greedy lose and the industrious wins. Greed leads to blind ambition and faith breeds determination.  Mighty is often defeated by the zealots. Reason questions but belief makes it viable. 

Sincerity is a certainly great asset but skill is a requirement. Where a flower represents reproduction the thorn means protection. Of course flattery is soothing yet criticism is eye opener. The successful must know the difference between a foot licking cat and a yelling friend. Power, fame and success are deafening but stumbling brings reality back. Nothing lasts forever yet the laws of nature do. 

While sitting on the throne of success one should remember that there was someone else sitting there before the one. And many others are constantly trying hard to get there. 

There’s been a continuous contest for power, fame and wealth and it will remain so. Success basically is the product of struggle; it definitely becomes stagnant specially in the absence of hard work. 

 Success is a path that is prone to mistakes. Those who admit a mistake, learn from it and refrain from repeating it tend to last longer. Longer or shorter 

all those who rise will fall. Some fall gracefully and some fall in violence.

There are many reasons for battles. Yet the most important of them for all is the one for equality among humans & beyond. And that’s the most difficult one. In a fight for social justice, losing is no issue,  because fighting for it matters the most. 

“The only real struggle in the history of the world…is between the vested interest and social justice.”

Arnold Joseph Toynbee

By

Ahsan Jamil

Golfer, Blogger, Entrepreneur, Author, Poet, Wanderer, photographer, Rebel.

Email: Golfaij@gmail.com

Website: Golfaij.com

YouTube: Morning with Golf

The Leap Forward

Near the historic vicinity of Garhi Shahu, Lahore, there stands a tall communication tower loaded with satellites linked to various companies. Close by, a glorious minaret of Shalimar Garden burns in anger. It objects to the presence of the ugly communication tower. The communication tower has no architectural value. Rather, it tries to undermine the articulation of the garden.  

Although the distance between the aforementioned minaret of Shalimar Gardens and the communication tower is less than a mile, it took humans five centuries to cover these yards. That garden tower was created to keep Lahoriattes at bay—away from the emperor’s activities. On the other hand, communication towers make it possible for humans to talk to each other telephonically. It evaporates the distances between them that sometimes stretch across continents. Societies run on such communication. And towers play a vital role, too. 

At the second green of the Royal Palm Golf & Country Club, there is a spot from where we can see the present amalgamating the past. The  horizons of different eras meet here. Lahore has seen so much over the millennia. Lahore had been a regional political, cultural, business capital of Punjab. The city has witnessed the Harappan civilization controlling the rivers and their deltas. Mughals played a kinetic role in shaping Lahore as their launch pad. On the other hand, the Ranjeet Singh dynasty gave it a taste of indigenous rule. The British finally brought Lahore into the modern world. In the age of riverboats, Lahore served as a great trading port on the banks of the River Ravi. When Sher Shah Suri identified the grand dirt routes between Delhi and Kabul, Lahore again became the heart of that journey. The British railroads did the same. Lahore has been the Bilistring trade center and major marketplace in the land of five rivers. It is surrounded by the most fertile delta, which is known as the food basket of the world. Centuries meet here and it is a melting pot of cultures. A round of golf at the Royal Palm is a walk through history. On the east of the golf course floats an irrigation canal taking water from dams to the agricultural farms. Beyond that canal sits the cantonment and other modern housing societies. To the west, a railroad runs across the country. Behind that revolves the city and then the walled city. 

Lahore continued to grow and remained relevant because of its immense capacity to learn. Its adjustability and acceptance of newer trends and technologies is truly remarkable. Lahore has enormous eppitite to embrace change. The RPGCC itself has seen multiple transformations. From the railway officers’ club of the British Raj to the present day, it has seen numerous administrations and a host of changes. Once, its water hazards served as water reservoirs serving the railways workshops. Today they stand as fish ponds within the club. They are deep and extensive. The course grew from a small three-hole practice course to the present eighteen-hole tournament course. 

A radicle emerges from a germinating seed to fetch water to shoot to the plumule, which gradually develops into leaves and stems, and then a trunk and branches. These are all changes the seeds must go through, but first it has to shed its testa. In order to embrace change, we too need to emerge from our testas.

Anyhow, change is a strange phenomenon; it repents progress. They say nothing stays the same, yet Led Zeppelin sings, “Song remains the same.”

“Try not to resist changes that come your way. Instead let life live through you. And do not worry that your life is turning upside down. How do you know that the side you are used to is better than the one to come?”

Rumi

Credits 

Royal Palm GCC 

Google

YouTube 

By

Ahsan Jamil 

Golfer, Blogger, Entrepreneur, Author, Poet, Wanderer, photographer, Rebel. 

Email: Golfaij@gmail.com

Website: Golfaij.com 

YouTube: Morning with Golf

I know

“I am not a body with a soul, I am a soul that has a visible part called body.”

Juvairiya Adam

We are living in an era of information and communication. We know too much. They all carry encyclopedias in their palms and libraries in their pockets. You name it, they know it. Their high-tech life, infotech upbringing and extraterrestrial plans are a means to creating a host of innovations & endless creations. They produce Hard Rock and Abstract art. They fly remote control helicopters on Mars and their spaceships float across the cosmos. They use cordless widgets and solar energy. They drive fuel-free electric vehicles and take virtual tours. They attend online classes and work from home. They regularly play video games together without ever knowing each other physically. Organ transplant and stem cell procedures are a common phenomenon. In-vitro fertilizations and clonings are all within their grasp. Guys look like ladies and girls act like men. Gender transition and abortion are readily accepted. Marijuana is legal and hijab is illegal. Technically we have become a multiplanetary species. Human beings have strayed so far from those early caves. 

What did they lose on the way? The biggest outward erosion is of the environment, and the strongest inward loss is the ever-increasing lack of empathy. I must have an iPhone 13! Others may sleep on the streets at the corner of my skyscraper. Others’ hunger matters less than a date at Nusr-Et Steakhouse. Our empathy is constantly diminishing as we increasingly live online. The world on screen looks cleaner and much more colorful than it does in real life. Our isolation is insulating us against the realities of our surroundings. Our increasing self-reliance and use of machinery keep us aloof from the rest of society and we are learning to be selfish and to prefer living alone, thus promoting the culture of ‘Who cares.’ The loss is all ours.

“When we practice loving, kindness and compassion we are the first ones to profit.”

Rumi

I personally think we should lead a fruitful life like a tree. The tree gives a lot to its surroundings. The tree inhales carbon from the air and releases oxygen for the living. It provides home to birds, squirrels, insects, reptiles and so many others. It gives shade in scorching weather. It provides wood for fire in icy conditions. Its fallen leaves fertilize the soil it stands on. They say trees are ornaments of planet earth. I say they are its makeup. 

When wind flutes through a tree and swings its branches, it mesmerizes the atmosphere. When sunrays peek through the narrow gaps in its foliage, it swirls the heart of the environment. When raindrops fall on its crown, it rings bells of joy in the garden of life. Trees are friendly in all seasons—warm and cold. 

The autumn trees remind me of the emptiness of today’s lifestyle. On the barren path of commercialization, we walk naked without emotions and empathy. We have no time to hear our neighbor’s sobs. We no longer care what’s happening to our poor relatives. We are so busy in offices, at gyms, on the internet, at sports, that we have to be prompted by a TV commercial before we donate to charity. Our careers take precedence over our dreams. Our domestic life has also become ever more fragile. More marriages break than last. We value reason over emotions. Emotion promotes love and reason curbs it. Love breeds compassion and prudence questions passion. Yet our entire scientific progress is based on reason. No doubt reason saves us from superstitions, but it should never stop us from dreaming. After all, it is the leap of faith that propels an explorer to embark on a voyage. 

We should spare some time to get to know ourselves. We should explore our souls. A balance between reason and emotion can make life wonderful. A flute is merely a piece of wood till an artist’s lips touch it. 

“Until he extends his circle of compassion to all living things, man will not himself find peace.”

Albert Schweitzer

Credits 

Google

YouTube

By

Ahsan Jamil

Golfer, Blogger, Entrepreneur, Author, Poet, Wanderer, photographer, Rebel.

Email: Golfaij@gmail.com

Website: Golfaij.com

YouTube: Morning with Golf

Hometown

“It is the possibility of having a dream come true that makes life interesting.”

Paulo Coelho

In the city of Gujranwala there are more bridges and underpasses than there are traffic lights. The city has both bypasses and overhead flyovers, yet the traffic moves here like the tangled knots of a thread. Crawling through the tide of vehicles, we finally arrive at Gujranwala Golf Club. Tucked away from the GT Road, it sits on the southeastern curve of the beautiful Gujranwala cantonment.  

Golf aside, I often head over to this golf club to meet my childhood friends. Walking on home ground, in the company of old buddies and savoring the charm of being in the BBQ capital, makes the trip all the more worthwhile. 

Three cypress trees on the eighth fairway are another beautiful attraction of this course. The cypress adorns many gardens; poets liken it to a willowy sweetheart. This evergreen beauty pays no heed to weather changes and stands tall like an arrogant, curvy blond. Waris Shah, the famous Sufi poet, mentions the cypress in his story ‘Heer.’

ھیا غضب دا کٹک قندھار وچوں ۔ اڑد بازار وچوں ۔

وارث شاہ جاں نیناں دا داؤ لگے، کوئی بچے نہ جوئے دی ہار وچوں ۔ہوٹھ سرخ یاقوت جیوں لال چمکن، ٹھوڈی سیؤ ولائتی سار وچوں ۔

نکّ الف حسینی دا پپلا سی، زلف ناغ خزانے دی بار وچوں ۔

دند چمبے دی لڑی کہ ہنس موتی، دانے نکلے حسن انار وچوں ۔

لکھی چین کشمیر تصویر جٹی، کد سرو بہشت گلزار وچوں ۔

گردن کونج دی انگلیاں روھاں پھلیاں، ہتھ کولڑے برگ چنار وچوں ۔

باہاں ویلنے ویلیاں گنھ مکھن، چھاتی سنگ مر مر گنگ دھار وچوں ۔

چھاتی ٹھاٹھ دی ابھری پٹ کھینوں، سیؤ بلخ دے چنے انبار وچوں ۔

دھنی بہشت دے حوض دا مشک کبہ، پیٹو مخملی خاص سرکار وچوں ۔

کافور شہناں سرین بانکے، ساک حسن ستون مینار وچوں ۔

سرخی ہوٹھاں دی لوڑھ دنداسڑے دا، خوجے خطری قتل بازار وچوں ۔

شاہ پری دی بھین پنج پھول رانی، گجھی رہے نہ ہیر ہزار وچوں ۔

سئیاں نال لٹکدی مان متی، جویں ہرنیاں تٹھیاں بار وچوں ۔

اپرادھ اودھ دلت مصری، چمک نکلی تیغ دی دھار وچوں ۔

پھرے چھنکدی چاؤ دے نال جٹی، چڑ

لنک باغ دی پری کہ اندرانی، حور نکلی چند پروار وچوں ۔

پتلی پیکھنے دی نقش روم دا ہے، لدھا پری نے چند اجاڑ وچوں ۔

ایویں سرکدی آنودی لوڑھ لٹی، جویں کونج ٹر نکلی ڈار وچوں ۔

متھے آن لگن جہڑے بھور عاشق، نکل جان تلوار دی دھار وچوں ۔

عشقَ بولدا نڈھی دے تھانؤں تھانئیں، راگ نکلے زیل دی تار وچوں ۔

کزلباش اسوار جلاد خونی، نکل گیا اے

Who am I to interpret such a rich ode, written in honor of such a legendary, affectionate character. Why I am in love with those cypress triplets is hard to fathom. Yet I am proud of my affection for them. 

There are certain spots, some moments, a few faces and a few thoughts that we only see with the eye of our heart. They make us feel calm and peaceful. There can be no obvious, logical reason, but we can undoubtedly feel an invisible attraction towards them. 

“I found myself.”

Rumi

I was raised in Gujranwala. I saw many dreams and wove together some daydreams there—and fulfilled many of them. Wherever I’ve been, this city has always gone with me. And believe me, I’ve been around. In those days I strolled through its streets as a learner, as a dreamer and as a struggler. Today I walk its path fulfilled, grateful and satisfied. My grandparents, my mother, my daughter, my teachers, my friends who are no longer with me, who helped me become successful, may they Rest In Peace. They live no more, but through their creation, I am blessed and enjoying my life. God bless us all.

Credits 

Gujranwala Golf & County Club

Google

Paulo Coelho

By

Ahsan Jamil 

Golfer, Blogger, Entrepreneur, Author, Poet, Wanderer, photographer, Rebel. 

Email: Golfaij@gmail.com

Website: Golfaij.com 

YouTube: Morning with Golf

Spider’s Tree

On the 16th tee box of Lahore Gymkhana Golf Course, I noticed some tiny webs draped on a naked shrub. This tree is Capparis decidua, commonly known as karira. In the subcontinent its fruit is used to make pickles. Unfortunately the tree was totally winter ridden, and on top of that, a bunch of spider webs were mushrooming on its branches. In the absence of leaves, the webs were trying to fill the gaps. No doubt the webs attracted onlookers’ eyes and added a lot to the ambience and overall look of the tree. In reality, I was observing a takeover in progress. Earth witnesses innumerable takeovers and replacements during each changing season. 

This planet is home to so many life forms — from dust they come and to dust they will return. 

This tree was surrounded by more evergreen trees and some lush grass. It was a perfect example of natural coexistence. On the same spot, some of these organisms are dry and some are bright. On the same soil, some hibernate while others walk free. What a sequence of survival. Instead of hitting the one wood shot, most of us began to take pics of this eye-catching corner. 

Man’s relationship with plants is nothing new. It stretches from the forbidden fruit of the Garden of Eden to the burning bush at Mount Horeb. It further includes the Rose of Sharon and the gopher wood of Noah’s Ark.

Plants have always played a vital role in the development of civilizations. They were important then — but they’re even more important today as they are essential to human survival. 

The revolution began when humans learned about botany. That changed the landscape of the earth on a massive scale. Centuries of deforestation across the globe provided human beings with huge farm lands, cultivation, roads, cities and sprawling metropolises, thus replacing trees with concrete. That has already caused irreparable damage to the environment of this planet. And the practice continues. Industrialization further added to the escalating pollution levels, heightening gas emissions. And it wasn’t only the earth but also the skies that got polluted with space debris and damaged ozone. We urgently need to redefine our relationship with forests and plants. 

“Maybe you are searching among the branches, for what only appears in the roots.”

Rumi

We took the shots and proceeded towards the greens. This small tree said so much to me in such a brief time. I am already planning to visit my family farm this spring and plant some trees and flowers. Spring is approaching soon. I invite you all to sow a seed, plant a tree or grow flowers in your backyard. We must reciprocate the carbon we contribute to this planet with newer sources of oxygen. 

Not just for the environment but also for the ambience of our surroundings, too. Our kids can hang their swings on that tree. Some birds will appreciate the shelter and someone can seek shade from the scorching sun. You may find some dancing squirrels in your backyard or perhaps even hear a nightingale sing near your window. 

“He that plants trees loves others beside himself.”

Thomas Fuller 

Credits 

Google 

Wikipedia 

Mr. Shahbaz Malik, image & research 

Lahore Gymkhana Golf Course 

By

Ahsan Jamil 

Golfer, Blogger, Entrepreneur, Author, Poet, Wanderer, photographer, Rebel. 

Email: Golfaij@gmail.com

Website: Golfaij.com 

YouTube: Morning with Golf

Beyond Fog Lies Lahore

Weather conditions have a strange relationship of love and jealousy with me, yet I try to keep a positive attitude towards them. Through most of my trip to the states, temperatures remained at minus. On my wedding day a strong wind arrived uninvited, and a flood stalked me on my honeymoon. I have an eloped relationship with rain, but thunder keeps hunting the bounty. Golf, travel and shades strongly resent my love affair with fog, yet I love to live in mist — both physically and in my thoughts. Clouds hide the mighty and fog provides privacy. While wind carries the dust yet, it also moves the pollen. Dew cleans the petals and storms fill the lakes. Cool breezes soothe the deserts and sunshine brings forth the light. 

Today my beloved fog beckoned to me in another way. On my way back from New York, I was taking a connecting flight from Istanbul to Lahore. This flight got delayed seven-and-a-half hours because of fog in Lahore. The situation reminded me of a quote from Rumi:

“Beyond fog lies clarity.”

I would amend that a little, to 

“Beyond fog lies Lahore.”

Once one finds oneself surrounded by fog, the only way to see through it is through faith. 

As narrated by Corrie ten Boom

“Faith is like a radar that sees through the fog.”

Travel itself is a great teacher. This time, it sort of introduced us to how our offspring would be traveling to other planets. Because of a long delay before our connecting flight, we ended up checking into an airport hotel called “Yotel” at Istanbul. Its small rooms are designed like a spaceship cabin. We get to experience the feeling of being in a cabin of a future spaceship. A marvelous experience. The design is so practical and the way they’ve utilized space is out of this world. As there are no windows, they a bulb had been positioned behind a plastic sheet to give a feeling of sunshine outside. How children of cave dwellers educated themselves in living standards over the millenniums amazes me sometimes. And their enhanced capacity to travel fast and far adds to that amazement even more. 

The cabin has an attached bath, TV, fridge, Wi-Fi, Comcast, folding queen bed and all we needed, yet it was still so small. Fog did disturb my schedule, but on the other hand it gave us a taste of space travel(!) and turned an ordinary flight into an imaginary time travel. I am still an hour away from Lahore. Counting on a smooth landing, I am hoping the fog will soon dissipate since a seven-and-a-half hour delay is no joke. I am so very excited to resume golf tomorrow. To have a great day with friends. There is no place better than Lahore and there are no better caddies elsewhere except in Thailand. 😀

Credits

Google

Yotel

By

Ahsan Jamil

Golfer, Blogger, Entrepreneur, Author, Poet, Wanderer, photographer, Rebel.

Email: Golfaij@gmail.com

Website: Golfaij.com

YouTube: Morning with Golf

New Year’s Eve

Leaving Manhattan on New Year’s Eve can be depressing, but this year it turned out to be a great move———and I was looking forward to it. My son had made a reservation at a golf resort at Absecon near Atlantic City. The villa at Marriott Fairways was comfy and loaded. They claim to have seven affiliated golf courses. Despite it being December & January. the weather was touching double digits in degrees Celsius. I was really keen to play the famous Bay Course at this resort, but unfortunately it was unexpectedly closed for the season.

We played at The Pines Course. As long as you avoid the surrounding pines, this is not a particularly challenging course. On the other hand, you can’t afford to take your eye off the ball. I was playing with my son and we were joined by a New Jerseyan who was a great golfer. He led us throughout the course and in fact the entire game. He began to unleash all his golf skills in a chain of birdies and pars. Sipping on his Jack Daniel’s, he just kept rolling. His game reminded me of Esa Eyaz’s. Khizar tried to catch him but remained a couple of knots behind. I managed to play my best putting — and sporadic phenomenal — shots, which kept me on the edge in the contest. We all enjoyed the game on that last day of 2021.

Atlantic City, famously known as “America’s Playground” and “Monopoly City,” is a coastal resort city known for its casinos, boardwalk, beaches and American pageants. The city on this new year, like the rest of the world, was under the spell of the virus attack. Things were a lot different from the norm.

We had lunch at the Hard Rock Cafe but refrained from the roulette wheels, slot machines and blackjack tables. It was too cold for beaches — and we knew that a long time before we planned to celebrate the new year at Galloway Township.

New Year’s Eve is a great mathematical chorus regularly sung on the last night of each year. Cheering crowds used to celebrate at midnight parties throughout the world. Sydney is the first place to ring in the new year time-wise; the largest party in the world is held at Rio’s Copacabana Beach; the famous Times Square New Year’s Eve Ball is hoisted to the top of a 77-foot flagpole in readiness for a 60-second drop just before the stroke of midnight in New York City; Disney celebrates at Orlando Theme Park, Florida; London’s Thames River & Trafalgar Square cheer; the people of Paris exchange bonne année kisses; Dubai is illuminated by grand light shows; and the whole world rejoices on this annual celebration. Since the spread of COVID-19, such parties have dimmed and New Year’s Eve has now evolved into a domestic party. 

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Out of the five days we stayed in Galloway NJ, we played golf only twice thanks to the inclement weather. Although the days were fairly mild, fog took over south Jersey in all its veils. Being Lahoriattes, we are used to fog. But without caddies it’s not possible to play golf in low visibility. 

However, despite the lower visibility and the masks on our faces, we were still able to see a great deal. With masks, most people look alike. It brings a strange equity and unique union among all. Look how a common enemy brings people together. Against the virus attack the whole world is working together. Whereas only a few months ago the female face cover was a global heated debate, suddenly governments are making face masks compulsory. One of the greatest qualities humans possess is adaptability. Once united, human beings can be the mightiest force in the entire cosmos. 

“Together we stand, divided we fall.”

John Dickinson

Credits

The Liberty song by John Dickinson 

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Hard Rock Casino Atlantic City

The Pines Golf Course Galloway NJ 

By

Ahsan Jamil 

Golfer, Blogger, Entrepreneur, Author, Poet, Wanderer, photographer, Rebel. 

Email: Golfaij@gmail.com

Website: Golfaij.com 

YouTube: Morning with Golf